Livermore Valley

COVID-19 Update

As a result of the sustained progress on several key indicators regarding containment of COVID-19, the Alameda County Public Health Department issued two new orders on Monday, May 18, 2020. 1) An updated Shelter in Place Order that allows retail establishments to offer storefront pick-up. It also allows the manufacturing, warehousing, and logistical operations that support retail to resume. 2) An order allowing for certain highly regulated vehicle-based gatherings.


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About Livermore Valley

Less than an hour east of San Francisco, Livermore Valley Wine Country welcomes visitors with a flourish expanse of vineyards, wineries, and wine country experiences. Amid picturesque canyons, ridges and outposts of suburbia, the lush vines and convivial tasting rooms increasingly define the quality of life in the valley. One of California's oldest wine regions, the Livermore Valley played a pivotal role in shaping California's wine industry. Spanish missionaries planted the first wine grapes in the Livermore Valley in the 1760s. In the 1840s, California pioneers looking for outstanding vineyard sites began planting grapes in the region. Robert Livermore planted the first commercial vines in the 1840s. Pioneer winemakers C. H. Wente, James Concannon, and Charles Wetmore recognized the area's winegrowing potential and founded their wineries in the early 1880s. Livermore Valley captured America's first international gold medal for wine in 1889 at the Paris Exposition, putting California on the world wine map. Livermore Valley wineries were the first to bottle varietal-labeled Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Petite Sirah. Nearly 80% of California's Chardonnay vines trace their genetic roots to a Livermore Valley clone. Livermore Valley also boasted more than 50 wineries until Prohibition and contributed significantly to the state's enology and viticulture that lives on today. Attracted to the rich winemaking tradition, climate, soil and geography, new winemakers and vineyardists are working alongside fifth-generation winegrowers to create this Livermore Valley wine renaissance. The region now has over 40 wineries, with several more about to open, and more than 5,000 acres of vineyards. Wineries vary in size from limited release, 100-case labors of love to 400,000-case industry heavyweights, and grapes range from familiar Merlot and Chardonnay to Italian, Rhone, and Spanish varieties.

Less than an hour east of San Francisco, Livermore Valley Wine Country welcomes visitors with a flourish expanse of vineyards, wineries, and wine country experiences. Amid picturesque canyons, ridges and outposts of suburbia, the lush vines and convivial tasting rooms increasingly define the quality of life in the valley. One of California's oldest wine regions, the Livermore Valley played a pivotal role in shaping California's wine industry. Spanish missionaries planted the first wine grapes in the Livermore Valley in the 1760s. In the 1840s, California pioneers looking for outstanding vineyard sites began planting grapes in the region. Robert Livermore planted the first commercial vines in the 1840s. Pioneer winemakers C. H. Wente, James Concannon, and Charles Wetmore recognized the area's winegrowing potential and founded their wineries in the early 1880s. Livermore Valley captured America's first international gold medal for wine in 1889 at the Paris Exposition, putting California on the world wine map. Livermore Valley wineries were the first to bottle varietal-labeled Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Petite Sirah. Nearly 80% of California's Chardonnay vines trace their genetic roots to a Livermore Valley clone. Livermore Valley also boasted more than 50 wineries until Prohibition and contributed significantly to the state's enology and viticulture that lives on today. Attracted to the rich winemaking tradition, climate, soil and geography, new winemakers and vineyardists are working alongside fifth-generation winegrowers to create this Livermore Valley wine renaissance. The region now has over 40 wineries, with several more about to open, and more than 5,000 acres of vineyards. Wineries vary in size from limited release, 100-case labors of love to 400,000-case industry heavyweights, and grapes range from familiar Merlot and Chardonnay to Italian, Rhone, and Spanish varieties.

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Getting There

The City of Livermore is located approximately 30 miles east of the San Francisco Bay in the Tri-Valley region of Alameda County, adjacent to the I-580 corridor at the junction of State Route 84 and Isabel Avenue. Public transit is plentiful in the Livermore Valley. The Livermore Amador Valley Transit Authority provides WHEELS local bus service throughout Livermore. The BART station is located a short distance west of Livermore. The Altamont Corridor Express (ACE) train runs to and from Stockton and San Jose, with two stations in Livermore.