Napa Valley

COVID-19 Update

Updated: July 26, 2020: Napa Valley hotels and retail shops are open and welcoming guests. Wineries and restaurants are also open for outdoor service. Capacity is very limited, and advanced reservations are required for all wine tasting experiences and strongly suggested for dining. Indoor service at wineries and restaurants is currently closed, as are all bars. Napa Valley kindly asks that you help protect yourself, your family, and the community from the threat of COVID-19 by minding the safety protocols, only visiting with members of your household, adhering to social distancing guidelines, and wearing masks unless seated. Click here for more information.


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About Napa Valley

Though just 30 miles long and a few miles wide, Napa Valley is home to diverse microclimates and soils uniquely suited to the cultivation of a variety of fine wine grapes. Among the internationally acclaimed wines produced in this small region are Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Zinfandel and Cabernet Franc. As the first Agricultural Preserve in America, it’s also a region of incomparable natural beauty and winegrowing heritage being preserved for future generations through environmental leadership and community stewardship. Though just 4% of California’s wine grape harvest, Napa Valley is small in size yet big in stature. It was the first American Viticultural Area or AVA to be designated in California in 1981. Only 2% of the world enjoys a dry Mediterranean climate. In Napa Valley this generous climate provides vintage-to-vintage consistency and exceptional quality that few other winegrowing regions can boast. Because of its unique geologic history, Napa Valley has a remarkable diversity of microclimates, weather and geography, as well as some of the most diverse soils found on earth. As a result, an array of premium wine grapes thrives here. In spite of its international renown, Napa Valley is one of the smallest winegrowing regions in the world, with only one-sixth the planted acreage of Bordeaux. Nearly all wineries (95%) are family owned businesses. The region’s established viticultural practices result in low yields of high-quality grapes, from which skilled winemakers craft Napa Valley’s renowned wines.

Though just 30 miles long and a few miles wide, Napa Valley is home to diverse microclimates and soils uniquely suited to the cultivation of a variety of fine wine grapes. Among the internationally acclaimed wines produced in this small region are Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Zinfandel and Cabernet Franc. As the first Agricultural Preserve in America, it’s also a region of incomparable natural beauty and winegrowing heritage being preserved for future generations through environmental leadership and community stewardship. Though just 4% of California’s wine grape harvest, Napa Valley is small in size yet big in stature. It was the first American Viticultural Area or AVA to be designated in California in 1981. Only 2% of the world enjoys a dry Mediterranean climate. In Napa Valley this generous climate provides vintage-to-vintage consistency and exceptional quality that few other winegrowing regions can boast. Because of its unique geologic history, Napa Valley has a remarkable diversity of microclimates, weather and geography, as well as some of the most diverse soils found on earth. As a result, an array of premium wine grapes thrives here. In spite of its international renown, Napa Valley is one of the smallest winegrowing regions in the world, with only one-sixth the planted acreage of Bordeaux. Nearly all wineries (95%) are family owned businesses. The region’s established viticultural practices result in low yields of high-quality grapes, from which skilled winemakers craft Napa Valley’s renowned wines.

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Getting There

Napa Valley wine country is most easily accessible by car. From San Francisco: Take US-101 North to Highway 37, then connect to Highway 121 and Highway 29. From East Bay: Take US-80 North, exiting at American Canyon Road West, which connects to Highway 29 North. From Sacramento: Take US-80 West to Highway 12, then connect to Highway 121 and Highway 29.